Signs Of Good Health

Sep 2, 2013 by

The following is a list of things to observe both in selecting a hedgehog as a pet and as a way to identify potential problems with your pet. Eyes Check it’s eyes to make sure they are bold, clear, round, and bright. The eyes should be wide open. The eyes should not be watery or sunken or dull. They should not have any discharge or matting of the fur around the eye. Nose The hedgehog’s nose should be moist and clean. It should not be dry, bubbly, or running. Keep in mind hedgehogs have an excellent sense of smell so that nose is likely to be busy sniffing you or the air to check out it’s surrounds. Ears Your hedgehog’s ears should be clean with no drainage or crustiness of the fur at the base of the ear. There should be no flaking or “finger-like” projections on the outer part of the ear. Some hedgehog babies may have ear damage that occurs during birth or at a young age. As long as the wound has healed a less than perfectly shaped ear should not affect its quality of life or health status. Skin and Quills Check the skin to make sure there are no: abrasions open wounds lumps bumps excessive dryness Missing quills or bare patches may be a sign of mites. Some colors of babies may appear to have thinner, less dense quills and...

Ears & Hearing

May 27, 2013 by

Ear Description and Hearing Hedgehogs have large ears and have an excellent sense of hearing, making them alert to their surroundings. Unfamiliar sounds or loud noises can cause hedgehogs to react by huffing and ducking their heads, in defense. Hedgehogs can become accustomed to a busy household, but it may take some time to get used to new surroundings. Providing continual background music to animals is quite beneficial, because it diminishes other, possibly disturbing sounds. Hedgehogs are able to sense high pitched sounds that the human ear cannot. You must take into consideration, any electronic devices near your hedgehog, such as computer.  These high-pitched sounds can be irritating to your hedgehog. Hearing Related to Handling Hedgehogs can and will become accustomed to your voice and sounds in its environment. Use this to your advantage in your handling and bonding process. When you get your hedgehog out of its cage, first tap on the side and talk to it for a moment.  That will give your hedgehog advance notice of what you are preparing to do. At Millermeade Farms our hedgehogs all know the sound of their feed cart and most of them are ready and waiting at feeding...

Nose & Smelling

May 27, 2013 by

Keen Sense of Smell Hedgehogs have a keen sense of smell that is very useful to them in search of food and detecting danger. Their nose is warm and moist and a curious hedgehog will have their snout in the air sniffing, in order to gather information from it’s environment. At the slightest threat of danger (usually detected by noise or movement) they will duck their head for protection. Smell Related to Bonding Placing a T-Shirt that you’ve slept in, over your hedgehog’s cage, is one of the simplest ways for you to bond.  The hedgehog will associate your smell as part of it’s environment. Another way to incorporate your smell with your hedgehog, is to sleep with your hedgehog’s sleeping bag. Again, the hedgehog will associate your smell with a comfortable place. Some people take fleece and cut it into two-inch squares and tuck those fabric squares into their clothing. Many hedgehogs have been known to carry around these little squares like security blankets. Holding your hedgehog and allowing it to snuggle into your arm or fall asleep on you is an excellent form of bonding. Your hedgehog will appreciate your warm body and the comfortable place to snuggle. Your goal is for your hedgehog to associate your scent with comfort or something that is pleasant. For instance when our kids come into the house and smell chocolate chip cookies they immediately think...