Obesity & Obesity Complications

Nov 11, 2013 by

   Many veterinarians will agree that one of  the most common medical problem seen in captive hedgehogs is obesity and obesity related problems. Cause Diet A few hedgehog enthusiasts discourage limiting a hedgehog’s food and claim that hedgehogs will not over eat. However, an overwhelming number of experts and enthusiast disagree. Hedgehogs can overeat even on a low-fat hedgehog diet, so food intake often must be restricted to maintain proper body weight. Overeating of foods too high in fat and protein such as regular cat food and fatty insects such as wax worms, mealworms, and superworms is a significant culprit of obesity. Exercise Lack of exercise is also a huge contributing factor. Cages that are too small can limit exercise and activity. However, when hedgehogs are a healthy weight they can become more active by running on their wheel and exploring their cage at night. Other Some hedgehogs are prone to obesity due to genetic predisposition. Other hedgehogs can become overweight in preparation for a lengthy hibernation that they would experience in the wild, but in captivity that that never comes. Hibernation attempts in captivity can   Detection Weight There is no standard weight for a hedgehog. The reason being that the sizes vary quite a lot from one breeder to another, so figuring out what is obese can be difficult. The typical healthy hedgehog is actually usually on the plump side but is...

Signs Of Good Health

Sep 2, 2013 by

The following is a list of things to observe both in selecting a hedgehog as a pet and as a way to identify potential problems with your pet. Eyes Check it’s eyes to make sure they are bold, clear, round, and bright. The eyes should be wide open. The eyes should not be watery or sunken or dull. They should not have any discharge or matting of the fur around the eye. Nose The hedgehog’s nose should be moist and clean. It should not be dry, bubbly, or running. Keep in mind hedgehogs have an excellent sense of smell so that nose is likely to be busy sniffing you or the air to check out it’s surrounds. Ears Your hedgehog’s ears should be clean with no drainage or crustiness of the fur at the base of the ear. There should be no flaking or “finger-like” projections on the outer part of the ear. Some hedgehog babies may have ear damage that occurs during birth or at a young age. As long as the wound has healed a less than perfectly shaped ear should not affect its quality of life or health status. Skin and Quills Check the skin to make sure there are no: abrasions open wounds lumps bumps excessive dryness Missing quills or bare patches may be a sign of mites. Some colors of babies may appear to have thinner, less dense quills and...

Selection Of Your New Hedgehog

Jul 6, 2013 by

It is best to select a hedgehog that is between 6-12 weeks old. Young hedgehogs usually adapt to a new environment more easily than older animals. However, there are times when younger babies have a difficult time quilling and are more comfortable and social after the largest part of the quilling process is over. Hedgehogs over six months may still make good pets with extra precautions. All hedgehogs should be easy to handle at the time of purchase. Each hedgehog will have it’s own personality, and it is best to choose the hedgehog that is similar to what you are looking for in at pet. However, the personality you see at the time of purchase will change and develop over time, depending on how you handle your new pet. Most hedgehogs will be a little nervous when they are first handled by a strange person or when they first wake up, but they should calm down and relax within a minute or two. The hedgehog should come out of a ball fairly quickly. Huffing is OK because that is part of hedgehog nature and communication. The hedgehog should not click, jump or pop, because that means it is trying to defend itself and it is trying to threaten you. You should be able to physically examine your hedgehog to ensure good...

Health Guarantee

Jun 11, 2013 by

At Millermeade Farms we do our very best to produce the highest quality animals possible.  We pledge that to the best of our knowledge all the animals we sell are free from any known health problems. Should we have any concerns we will point them out prior to the animal going home.  It is not uncommon for small problems to develop such as a nip from a cage-mate, a quilling related complication, or even an injury to develop unexpectedly.  If you have concerns with the animal you are about to purchase, please express your concerns to us and do not purchase the animal.  We would rather not make a sale than sell an animal that doesn’t meet our quality standards. Both our reputation and customer satisfaction are important to us and so we are happy to offer the following health guarantee. We are USDA licensed and one of the requirements is to have routine visits by our veterinarian. We can provide heath papers from our veterinarian for an additional $60.00. Hedgehog longevity has many contributing factors including but not limited but are not limited too: Breeding & Genetics Diet Water Temperature Bedding Exercise Accidents Illnesses Promptness and Quality of Veterinary Care Stress Breeding Some of these factors are related to care, others to the risk of owning a living being, and others are related to breeding and genetics.  The factors covered in our health...

Monitoring Hedgehog Health

Jun 11, 2013 by

Pet hedgehogs depend on us to provide quality care throughout their life and to recognize any potential health concerns.  You should visually inspect your hedgehog everyday while handling your hedgie and look for any signs of change or concerns.  An observant owner may detect potential problems while they are still treatable, thus ensuring greater health and longevity of their pet.  Visual Inspection Check its eyes to make sure they are bold, clear, round, and bright.  The eyes should be wide open. The eyes should not be watery or sunken, dull, or have any discharge. The hedgehog’s nose should be moist and clean.  It should not be dry, bubbly, or running. Your hedgehog’s ears should be clean with no drainage, crustiness, or flaking on the outer part of the ear. Check the skin to make sure there are no abrasions, lumps, bumps, excessive dryness, bare patches, or signs of mites.  The underbelly fur should not be matted. The hedgehog’s body should be filled out through the back and sides. Some hedgehogs have a streamlined appearance, but their skin should not be loose and they should be filled out below the ribs. Other hedgehogs are plumper, but they should not be so fat that they cannot easily roll into a ball. Breathing should be regular with no wheezing or signs of stress.  Do not confuse the normal hedgehog huffing for the rattle of a respiratory illness. Notice the amount of food and water consumption from the previous night and has the hedgehog gained or lost a significant...

Signs Of Good Health

Jun 11, 2013 by

The following is a list of things to observe both in selecting a hedgehog as a pet and as a way to identify potential problems with your pet. Eyes Check its eyes to make sure they are bold, clear, round, and bright.  The eyes should be wide open. The eyes should not be watery or sunken or dull. They should not have any discharge or matting of the fur around the eye. Nose The hedgehog’s nose should be moist and clean.  It should not be dry, bubbly, or running. Keep in mind hedgehogs have an excellent sense of smell so that nose is likely to be busy sniffing you or the air to check out its surrounds. Ears Your hedgehog’s ears should be clean with no drainage or crustiness of the fur at the base of the ear. There should be no flaking or “finger-like” projections on the outer part of the ear. Some hedgehog babies may have ear damage that occurs during birth or at a young age.  As long as the wound has healed a less than perfectly shaped ear should not affect its quality of life or health status. Skin and Quills Check the skin to make sure there are no abrasions or open wounds. Lumps Bumps Excessive dryness Missing quills or bare patches may be a sign of mites. Some colors of babies may appear to have thinner, less dense quills and may look a little bare when...