Heating Options

Jun 5, 2013 by

Words of Caution  Many heat sources are available through a variety of outlets. We are yet to find the perfect heat source that will work under all conditions. Anything that plugs in has potential to short out and cause a fire, overheat and cause burns, or fail to work. One must be cautious with overhead heating options so that they are not knocked over causing burns, injuries or fires. Also, hedgehogs can over-heat a small aquarium that is not well ventilated. Hedgehogs can get burnt both internally and externally by not being able to move away from the constant heat sources such as heating rocks and heating pads. The best heating options seem to be maintaining an appropriate ambient room temperature or heating only a portion of the cage so that the hedgehog can move away if it gets too hot. Infratherm Pet Heaters The following information is from the Sweeter Heater website: The SWEETER HEATER has no hot spots, it develops a uniform heat pattern, it uses less power to operate, it is unbreakable, it is sealed so it can be washed, and it has a three-year warranty. The SWEETER HEATER is a safe, non-breakable, energy efficient, long lasting (three year warranty) and reliable specific area heater. The SWEETER HEATER has been tested and proven by our customers since 1995. Veterinarians, aviaries, dog breeders, kennel owners and herpetologists have proven that the Sweeter...

Heat Emitters

May 28, 2013 by

Benefits Heat emitters are possibly the best option as a direct heat source. The benefits of the ceramic bulbs compared to traditional heat bulbs are that they do not emit light (only heat) therefore they produce more heat per watt than a traditional heat bulb that produces both light and heat. Heat lamps emitting light are less than ideal for nocturnal animals, as the light will affect their sleep pattern.  Heat emitters last a lot longer than traditional heat bulbs. Dimmable clamp lamps include a built in rheostat, which can lower the amount of heat produced by higher wattage bulbs when extra heat is not necessary. The highest watt bulb (150W) has the most use flexibility when using a wire cage even without a base lacking a rheostat. A rheostat is helpful because it can control the amount of heat a bulb can produce. The height of the lamp may be raised or lowered to increase or decrease the heat emitted in the cage. Wire cages typically require more heat because the heat is not confined as compared to an aquarium with the same dimensions. Cautions One should use caution when using the heat emitters with plastic tote type cages or any plastic accessory in the cage that the heat could damage. The ceramic heat emitters must be used with a lamp base designed for ceramic emitters and rated for the appropriate wattage. A...

Temperature Requirements

May 15, 2013 by

Thermo-Sensitive Hedgehogs are very sensitive to temperatures when compared to dogs or cats. They do not cope well with sudden changes in temperature. We have found that warm room temperatures are better than cool room temperatures. Hedgehogs that get too cool can go into a false or light hibernation, which can be deadly. Hedgehogs that are too cool can become torpid, lethargic, and will start to lose interest in food. Aestivation is a short hibernation that occurs when temperatures are too hot. Both hibernation and aestivation are not normal or healthy for pet hedgehogs. Optimal Temperature Keep your hedgehog out of drafts and in a warm and well-lit location, but not in direct sunlight. Various books and online care information will suggest temperatures ranging from 65°F to 80°F as the preferred temperature. Our hedgehogs are accustomed to temperatures around 80°F. We prefer our animal room to stay between 75°F and 85°F. You should shoot for a higher temperature if the temperature is going to fluctuate so that the lower temperature is still within the recommended range. Lower temperatures lead to eating less and lower activity, and that makes the animal more susceptible to respiratory and other opportunistic infections. Temperatures below 65°F can induce torpor that can be very dangerous to your pet. Pet hedgehogs have been known to die at sudden drops of temperatures this low. Other hedgehog owners may suggest cooler temperatures, but...

Preparing For Power Outages

Apr 25, 2013 by

Potential Need for Back-up Heat One must always be prepared for a power outage if you live in an area that’s temperature gets cold or cool in the winter. Power outages for long periods in cool weather can be just as dangerous as short power outages in extreme cold. When using alternative power or heat, one must use caution and be aware of potential safety hazards. Conserve the Heat You Have Wrap your hedgehog’s cage in heavy blankets. Give your hedgehog extra sleeping bags, or extra pieces of fleece to make their sleeping area cozier. Disposable (Or Reusable) Instant Heat Packs These sources of instant heat hand warmers can be found in the hunting, camping, or sporting goods section of most stores. We have also seen them used for reptiles and other baby animals, so you may find them through various other sources as well. Re-usable ones can often be found at flea markets or through other specialty vendors. They are relatively inexpensive and easy to store. We have found that some will not work if they have been stored for long periods. It is a good idea to have fresh ones available. Also make sure you keep several on hand in case you have purchased an older or defective warmer. Generators Generators are valuable to not only your pets, but can be quite handy for you. There is a huge price range depending...