FAQ

Jun 11, 2013 by

Answers to most of our frequently asked questions can be found on our website under the tab“Hedgehog Info.” Our most popular link is our Available Animals page. Please feel free to explore our website – there is a lot of useful information there as well 😉 Here is a list of our most popular FAQs: About Our Babies Decision Making Purchasing Options Appointments Pricing Products Shipping and On the Road Health Care At...

Are Hedgehogs Solitary or Social?

May 27, 2013 by

In the Wild Hedgehogs are normally solitary in the wild, socializing for breeding purposes. Males do not help raise the babies, and babies leave the mother shortly after the weaning process. Hedgehogs search and scavenge for their own food, and do not depend on other hedgehogs for survival. Solitary There are many books and hedgehog references that identify hedgehogs as solitary creatures that should be housed individually. Unlike sugar gliders, prairie dogs, and meerkats  hedgehogs do not live in colony settings. Hedgehogs do not pair for life, and do not form natural bonds with other hedgehogs in the wild. Housing hedgehogs individually is the safest means of housing, and is in no way detrimental to the average pet. Weanling Babies Young hedgehogs often prefer to sleep together, and do better after the weaning process if they are kept in small groups, rather than housed individually. By the age of eight weeks, weanling babies should be housed separately by gender. Cohabitation Success We have seen many cases of cohabitation success, and many rescue organizations frequently cohabitate compatible hedgehogs. Some hedgehogs actively strive to be with other hedgehogs.  We have had females which appeared to be happier when they were either breeding or with babies.  When the hedgehogs were left alone, they spent a considerable amount of energy trying to escape to join another hedgehog. Cohabitation Risks One disadvantage to cohabitation is that you cannot be...

Personality & Intelligence

May 27, 2013 by

Naturally Shy and Nervous Hedgehogs are probably the biggest scaredy cats of all animals that breeders have worked with in critter careers. They are easily scared anytime they see, hear, smell, or sense something through their sense of motion detection. That naturally built-in sense of fear of the unknown is what has helped, this basically, defenseless critter survive in the wild. Once a hedgehog feels safe, it will start to uncurl and begin to investigate its surroundings. It will begin to put down its spines and relax when it realizes that there is no danger. A good comparison to a cautious hedgehog is a prairie dog, meerkat, or groundhog, popping its head out of its lookout hole scouting for danger. When the critter senses danger, it goes back into the hole. If no danger seems to be present it will cautiously come out of its hole and investigate further. The primary difference between a hedgehog and the animals mentioned previously is that a hedgehog has no hole to hide in for safety. Its thorny ball of prickles is its only defense to the dangers of the world. Curious Explorers Some hedgehogs are brave explorers and will immediately uncurl and start walking on your hands. Others will start out by sniffing and duck their head at the slightest of noises.The average hedgehog will begin to put down its spines and relax when it realizes that...