About Our Babies FAQ

Nov 11, 2013 by

How often do you have babies? We babies born every week so we have new babies that are ready to go each week. How old are the babies when they are ready to go? Almost all of our babies are ready to go by six weeks of age. We always make sure babies are eating and drinking well on their own and are an appropriate size before letting them leave. We try to have babies placed in new homes by the time they are 12 weeks old.  There are times when babies have a lengthy quilling stage and are friendlier after the bulk of their quilling is complete.  These hedgehogs may be older than 12 weeks.  As always, you will have a choice of hedgehogs when you come. There is a hedgehog that I am interested in, but what if I don’t bond with that one? Can I put my favorite on hold and see how we react to each other? Or should I just come and see the different hedgehogs that you have available and then pick one? We suggest putting your deposit on your favorite. When you come you are welcome to meet and handle any other available babies. If you like another one better, you can choose that one. Reserving your favorite assures that you are not disappointed when you...

Deposits and Visits

Nov 11, 2013 by

I am ready to purchase my hedgehog. What’s next? The first step is to choose an available hedgehog and make an appointment to meet him/her. We are open Monday through Saturday. A $25.00 deposit reserves your favorite and an appointment time for you to come to our shop. Our Available Babies and our Products page have a list of all the things we sell to get you off to a great start with your pet! How long should I plan on being at our appointment? This will depend on several factors. First, how much time you spend preparing for your hedgehog and how well you understand your hedgehog’s needs. Sometimes this part is very quick but other times this part can last 45 minutes depending on the amount of questions. We believe the best time to answer questions is BEFORE you take your hedgehog home. Once you are introduced to your hedgehog, this could also take 45 minutes if you want to look at several hedgehogs and choose your favorite by learning different personalities. At this time we will also spend a great deal of time helping you feel confident handling this unique pet. Finally, the check out process can take anywhere from 15 minutes to a half hour or more depending on how long it takes you to make decisions and if there are other people making the same decisions at the same time. We suggest NOT...

Purchasing Options FAQ

Nov 11, 2013 by

 Once I place my deposit how will I know you received it? You’ll know two different ways. You should receive an automatic response from Paypal and you should receive an automatic response from us. If you get one from Paypal and not from us, be sure to check your Spam folder. Your automatic response will have pick up instructions, a note about directions, as well as tips to make your visit go more smoothly. Do the hedgehogs come with health papers and is there a health guarantee? We are USDA licensed and one of the requirements is to have routine visits by our veterinarian. We can provide heath papers from our veterinarian for an additional $60.00. Our health guarantee includes: A one-year guarantee for anything congenital. A one-year guarantee for cancer. A two-year guarantee for Wobbly Hedgehog Syndrome. A two-year guarantee for nutritional deficiencies provided you are following our diet recommendations. A necropsy report is necessary to fulfill the health guarantee is it will provide valuable information for our breeding program. I am still confused on what option to choose. How do I know what is the best option for me. If you do not put down $10 with one of the options, you are taking a risk that we are here. I run errands and all kinds of things and I am the only one who takes care of the appointments. We require...

Why Are Hedgehogs Expensive?

Jul 15, 2013 by

The average pet hedgehog is much more expensive than the average pet guinea pig, hamster, or rabbit. Hedgehogs are exotic animals; exotic or rare animals of all kinds are typically more expensive than average pets or livestock. Hedgehogs are relatively expensive to breed and sell. Very few breeders or retailers are willing to raise animals at a loss and so their expenses are reflected in the price of the animal. Hedgehogs have unique care and handling requirements. A good breeder or retailer will spend a considerable amount of time educating his/her customer about these requirements. Part of the price of an animal is the time required to breed and sell that animal. Exotic animal breeders and retailers are required to have a USDA license. This license requires additional time, effort, and expense on their part. Again, those costs must be passed on in the price of the animal. Our Becoming a Breeder guide goes into more detail about some of the risks and challenges breeders...

Selection Of Your New Hedgehog

Jul 6, 2013 by

It is best to select a hedgehog that is between 6-12 weeks old. Young hedgehogs usually adapt to a new environment more easily than older animals. However, there are times when younger babies have a difficult time quilling and are more comfortable and social after the largest part of the quilling process is over. Hedgehogs over six months may still make good pets with extra precautions. All hedgehogs should be easy to handle at the time of purchase. Each hedgehog will have it’s own personality, and it is best to choose the hedgehog that is similar to what you are looking for in at pet. However, the personality you see at the time of purchase will change and develop over time, depending on how you handle your new pet. Most hedgehogs will be a little nervous when they are first handled by a strange person or when they first wake up, but they should calm down and relax within a minute or two. The hedgehog should come out of a ball fairly quickly. Huffing is OK because that is part of hedgehog nature and communication. The hedgehog should not click, jump or pop, because that means it is trying to defend itself and it is trying to threaten you. You should be able to physically examine your hedgehog to ensure good...

Why Are Hedgehogs Difficult To Find?

Jul 6, 2013 by

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulates the sale of exotic animals. All pet stores selling hedgehogs and all breeders who have three or more females are required to be USDA licensed. Many pet stores and potential breeders simply do not want the hassle of becoming USDA licensed. Breeding and selling hedgehogs is a lot of work. Much time, effort and expense is necessary to care for the animals, as well as to market and sell the babies. Many people have commented to us “there must be a good market for hedgehog babies because there aren’t many around”. We believe the opposite is true. There aren’t many around because the market for them isn’t good. Our average customer drives 2.5 hours to get to us. If we relied on local customers we would have been out of business many years ago. There simply isn’t a huge demand for exotic pets. Raising hedgehogs is a prickly business! They aren’t as easy to breed as many people think. Breeders must educate themselves for success and they must be able to educate their...

Where To Purchase

Jun 30, 2013 by

Hedgehogs can be found in a few pet stores, through brokers at flea markets or animal sales, or they can be purchased directly from breeders When buying animals, we recommend that you check out the source. Observe the health of the animals, the sellers’ knowledge, and their reputation and experience. Compare buying hedgehogs to buying strawberries. It is possible to find great strawberries at your local super-store. On the other hand, these strawberries are mass-produced, artificially ripened, and probably do not have the wonderful flavor as some of your other options. The stock person may not be as knowledgeable as other vendors as to how they were produced, the quality, or other information. Another place to buy fruit is from a local fruit market or a roadside stand. These markets can be more selective in the quality and freshness of their products. This retailer tends to have more invested interest in you, as a customer, and is probably a little more educated in the product. Finally, you can go to a strawberry farm and pick your berries yourself. Your tasty treat may be a little more difficult to obtain, will take more work, but you will have a completely different product in the end. urchasing animals should not be a matter of convenience and lowest bottom dollar. It may be well worth going out of your way to select a hedgehog that is right...

Hedgehogs As Gifts

Jun 21, 2013 by

Time Spent With Your Breeder The time you spend with your breeder is one of the most important parts of purchasing a hedgehog. An experienced and knowledgeable breeder will give new owners a great deal of handling and care advice. A good breeder’s handling demonstration, and the new owner’s practice with the hedgehog, are keys to the new owner’s success. Learning to handle a hedgehog is comparable to learning to ride a bike. Personal instruction and practice are much better than watching a video or reading a book, and will have significantly greater results. Presenting a Hedgehog as a Gift (Without the Actual Animal) Gift certificate – many breeders will create a gift certificate that can be redeemed by the recipient for a hedgehog. Cage – a wrapped cage and/or accessories can be a great surprise for the expectant hedgehog owner. Stuffed animal – cute stuffed animal hedgehogs are excellent temporary substitutions of the real thing! Mystery Ride – some hedgehog owners-to-be may enjoy the thrill of a mystery ride to pick up their new pet. Pets for Youth and Children There are many things to consider when purchasing a hedgehog as a gift for a child. We strongly encourage you to read our article Pets for Youth and Children before consider a hedgehog as a gift to this age group. Opportunity to Select a Hedgehog as a Pet Some hedgehog breeders have a...

FAQ

Jun 11, 2013 by

Answers to most of our frequently asked questions can be found on our website under the tab“Hedgehog Info.” Our most popular link is our Available Animals page. Please feel free to explore our website – there is a lot of useful information there as well 😉 Here is a list of our most popular FAQs: About Our Babies Decision Making Purchasing Options Appointments Pricing Products Shipping and On the Road Health Care At...

Hedgehog Age Considerations When Purchasing A Hedgehog...

Jun 11, 2013 by

Target Age Most breeders recommend selecting a fully weaned hedgehog that is between six- and twelve-weeks old. Babies are fully weaned when they can eat and drink on their own, without their mother providing any of their nutrition. Babies Too Young Human nature makes us want to select the smallest, cutest baby possible, but this is not a good option for the safety and well-being of the animal. Due to their size and feeding requirements, breeders generally have very little success hand-rearing orphaned babies. For this reason, breeders do not sell newborn hedgehogs. Instead, babies are left with their mother until weaning age. Babies weaned too soon, or those that are too small, are too delicate to undergo shipping stresses (change in environments). They are also likely to have significantly more problems than babies that are slightly older and more independent. Hedgehog owners should expect babies to go through an almost continual quilling process until they are approximately twelve weeks old. This natural process can be uncomfortable for the young hedgehog, and can make transitioning to a new home even more stressful. Older Hedgehogs If the breeder or seller provides thorough care and handling instructions, older animals (five months or older) may still make good pets. Older animals typically require more patience from new owners because the bonding process is usually longer than with young hedgehogs. Contributor: Stasi Kruse-Kanyuck, Terrapin Hedgehogs www.terrapinhedgehogs.com/, Mary Lynn...

Signs Of Good Health

Jun 11, 2013 by

The following is a list of things to observe both in selecting a hedgehog as a pet and as a way to identify potential problems with your pet. Eyes Check its eyes to make sure they are bold, clear, round, and bright.  The eyes should be wide open. The eyes should not be watery or sunken or dull. They should not have any discharge or matting of the fur around the eye. Nose The hedgehog’s nose should be moist and clean.  It should not be dry, bubbly, or running. Keep in mind hedgehogs have an excellent sense of smell so that nose is likely to be busy sniffing you or the air to check out its surrounds. Ears Your hedgehog’s ears should be clean with no drainage or crustiness of the fur at the base of the ear. There should be no flaking or “finger-like” projections on the outer part of the ear. Some hedgehog babies may have ear damage that occurs during birth or at a young age.  As long as the wound has healed a less than perfectly shaped ear should not affect its quality of life or health status. Skin and Quills Check the skin to make sure there are no abrasions or open wounds. Lumps Bumps Excessive dryness Missing quills or bare patches may be a sign of mites. Some colors of babies may appear to have thinner, less dense quills and may look a little bare when...

Transition From The Breeder’s Home To Your Home...

May 25, 2013 by

 When to Feed Your Hedgehog Hedgehogs are typically crepuscular (awake during dusk and dawn) to nocturnal animals. Wild hedgehogs typically spend most of their awake-time hunting for food. We feed our animals in the morning because that is what our schedule allows. Our animals know the routine and are very well adjusted. Most of our hedgehogs come out and take a nibble of their favorite part of the mix and then go back to sleep and eat the rest in the evening. Other hedgehog owners find that evening feeding works well for them and it certainly doesn’t hurt hedgehogs to adjust to a new routine. Moist or wet food or treats should be left in the cage for about four hours to prevent spoilage. This needs to be kept in mind while developing a routine. Your hedgehog will adjust to feeding at any time during the day or evening but it is important to be consistent in feeding at the same time every day. Shipping Stress Overview Baby hedgehogs in transition to new homes are subject to “shipping” stress.  Shipping stress occurs in all types of animals and can occur at any age. The most common problems during shipping stress are diarrhea or loose stools, and/or not eating. Many hedgehogs are happy to discover a new wheel and be so absorbed with running that they forget to eat, drink, and attempt to use the...